Additional risk of diabetes exceeds the increased risk of cancer caused by radiation exposure after the Fukushima disaster.

refer previous post. See original document at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28957385
see also http://www.diabetesandenvironment.org/home/contam/radiation , “Diabetes and the Environment – Radiation” for an accounting of diabetes rates in high fallout areas due to the Chernobyl accident.

PLoS One. 2017 Sep 28;12(9):e0185259. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0185259. eCollection 2017.

Additional risk of diabetes exceeds the increased risk of cancer caused by radiation exposure after the Fukushima disaster.
Murakami M1,2, Tsubokura M3,4, Ono K5, Nomura S6,7, Oikawa T3.
Author information
Abstract

The 2011 Fukushima disaster led to increases in multiple risks (e.g., lifestyle diseases and radiation exposure) and fear among the public. Here, we assessed the additional risks of cancer caused by radiation and diabetes related to the disaster and the cost-effectiveness of countermeasures against these conditions. Our study included residents of the cities of Minamisoma and Soma (10-40 km and 35-50 km north of the Fukushima Daiichi (N° 1) Nuclear Power Station, respectively). We used the loss of life expectancy (LLE) as an indicator to compare risks between radiation exposure and diabetes. We also estimated the cost-effectiveness of radiation-related countermeasures, including restricted food distribution, decontamination, and whole-body counter tests and interventions. Metformin therapy was selected as a representative management for diabetes. The diabetes-related LLEs among residents were 4.1 (95% confidence interval: 1.4-6.8) ×10-2 years for the whole population and 8.0 (2.7-13.2) ×10-2 years for 40s to 70s in a scenario that considered the additional incidence of diabetes during the first 10 years. The cancer-related LLEs caused by lifetime exposure to radiation were 0.69 (2.5-97.5 percentile: 0.61-0.79) ×10-2 years for the whole population and 0.24 (0.20-0.29) ×10-2 years for 40s to 70s. The diabetes-related LLEs among residents in the above-mentioned scenario were 5.9-fold and 33-fold higher than those attributed to average radiation among the whole population and among the 40s to 70s age groups, respectively. The costs per life-years saved of the radiation countermeasures (i.e., restricted food distribution, decontamination, and whole-body counter tests and interventions) were >1 to >4 orders of magnitude higher than those of general heath checkups and conventional management for diabetes. Our findings indicate that countermeasures to mitigate diabetes are warranted. Policy-makers’ and individuals’ understanding of multiple risks after any disaster will be essential to saving the lives of victims.

PMID: 28957385 PMCID: PMC5619752 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0185259

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