The Science of Svensmark.

http://iugs.org/33igc/coco/EntryPage-c11714-p11078-e1-l7-p5002-o12092.html

Part of the debate and relevant papers about the work of Svensmark:

http://www.kaltesonne.de/neues-vom-svensmark-wolken-solarv…/
http://www.sciencedirect.com/…/article/pii/S0169809514002403
http://www.sciencedirect.com/…/article/pii/S1364682614002697
http://www.sciencedirect.com/…/article/pii/S0273117714005286
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/…/10.1…/2013JD021110/abstract
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/…/10.1…/2014GL061421/abstract
https://eos.org/resea…/solar-wind-may-affect-weather-climate
http://www.pnas.org/content/112/11/3253.abstract
http://www.sciencedirect.com/…/article/pii/S1364682615300316
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs13143-012-0025-3
http://joannenova.com.au/…/is-the-sun-driving-ozone-and-ch…/#
boyfromtottenham 7. October 2015 at 3:32 AM | Permalink | Reply
Hi from Oz. It is a well known fact that the sun (via “sunspots”) affects radio propagation on earth via ionisation in the ionosphere, and similarly causes Auroras, and that water is a polar molecule, meaning that water and water vapour is attracted /repelled by electric fields, as you may have learned at school (at least prior to 1988 or so). Lam’s paper above says “the solar-modulated cosmic rays were able to influence the clouds of the lower troposphere via the atmospheric electric field.” Given these facts, why is the solar electric field effect on clouds a surprise to any climate researcher? By the way, a search for “Is there a link between sunspot activity and the weather?” on the Australian Bureau of Meteorology web site still results in “The Bureau of Meteorology does not currently track sunspots.” I wonder why.
– See more at: http://notrickszone.com/…/eight-recent-papers-overshadow-…/… http://notrickszone.com/…/eight-recent-papers-overshadow-…/…

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